item7

CLOUDLAND CABIN JOURNAL - September 2016 Part B (16th - present - PART A is here)

item2a

cam1

Cloudland Colorado Campsite Cam, September 28 - clear and warmer

Journal updated on the 25th - five layers of clothing

Print Of The Week

09/16/16 So nice and "drippy" cool early this morning at Cloudland! We got a nice little shower yesterday that settled the dust and cooled things down - the air is sweet and saturated, as is the landscape. When we arrived home the other night late and stepped out of the van, we were greeted with a forest so LOUD we could hardly hear anything else - cicadas, crickets, tree frogs, and other night bugs. It was a wall of sound. There don't seem to be any night bugs in Colorado, other than the ones with four legs. Most mornings here the temp reaches the dew point and we awake to the sound of a gentle rain on our tin roof - dew running off the edge of the rood and splashing below.

Yesterday morning I was up at 4am-ish and went outside to soak in the stars - there were a zillion of them rising out of the clouds below, including the main winter constellation, Orion. I rumbled around a bit and found my camera and tripod and set up to take a few pictures. Most of the night bugs and frogs had gone to bed, so it was much quieter. But off in the distance - a mile or so up Whitaker creek - a pair of barred owls broke the silence and began to talk with one another. They were a little distance apart - probably on opposite side of the canyon - and each call would bounce off the tall bluffs and echo across the canyon. I could never detect that they ever got together - their calls remained coming from different locations.

cam

And then as dawn approached, a whippoorwill woke up and started to sing. Late summer mornings are just terrific here in Arkansas!

We had watershed moments yesterday. First, our very first forklift was delivered to the new book warehouse building at our property over near Jasper. I'd had plenty of help moving around the heavy pallets of books this past 30 years - from the Woods Boys, Benny, Pam's dad, and Jason and Jeff. And I've always had a pallet jack for moving them around inside the warehouse (we have a very small warehouse here). But as my back issues continue and we get ready to move to the other building sometime in the next year, I decided it was time for some mechanical help. I found a very old and VERY beat up forklift for sale at about 10% of new cost. Our new building will be smaller than what we have now, and we only receive new pallets several times a year so the forklift won't have too many hours a year put on it, but it will help immensely to unload pallets off trailers and from inside the van, and also to move them around inside the building. Here's a snap of it inside the new building where it will live - note they just completed the spray-foam insulation, and now we are waiting for the contractor to install the doors and siding. We are getting close...

forklift

And secondly, a photo I posted a couple of days ago on our business facebook page blasted right on through 100,000 views and became our all-time most viewed photo on facebook - the Harvest Moonrise (views don't put cash in our pockets, but it is a way to sometimes judge how folks feel about a photo - nearly 120,000 now in two days). If we only had a penny for each view...

All of our new publications are on their way to us and should arrive within a couple of weeks - so we'll get to try out the old forklift to see if it really works. You can pre-order all three products now, but as the shipment gets closer I'll keep ya posted as so when we'll have them in hand and ready to shop - we're hoping by the second week of October. We have a copy of all three and the reproduction is the best we've ever seen - YIPPIE!

09/16/16 Last night while outside taking a shower in the dark, I started to notice BRIGHT lights coming through the forest! It didn't take me long to realize where the lights were coming from and chuckle a little bit, then be rewarded by the rising almost-full moon. It was a brilliant sight, but only lasted a few moments then disappeared behind clouds.

Tonight while outside taking a shower in the dark there were LOTS of bright lights - in fact these lights were very LOUD too! 'Twas in the middle of waves of strong thunderstorms, with lightning bolts flashing and lighting up the sky, and my personal full moon shining too (not something you want to see - thankfully my full moon was buried deep in the woods).

It was kind of weird being out there with all the lightning - I had waited a couple of hours for it to stop but finally had to give in and just go for it. But the weird part was the fact that the Buffalo River (about 600 feet below but only about 200 yards to the east of me), was ROARING from all the rain, and it sounded like the river was up at my level just through the trees. In almost 20 years of living here I don't recall ever knowing the sound of the river quite like that. Hum, exactly HOW MUCH rain had we had?

My lovely bride and I sat on the back deck this evening grilling split chicken breasts and watched as the storms moved past. For a while we were completely dry - not a drop since morning. Lots of thunder boomers though. Then Pam pointed to a cloud about five miles away and noted that we were "about to get HIT!" But it was so far away. Note to self - ALWAYS listen to your wife! That cloud moved rapidly and in no time the cabin was engulfed and we were getting poured on. At one point there were clouds/fog banks or whatever moving in three different directions right in front of us, each going a different speed too. Dark sky, then sunshine. White clouds, gray clouds, black clouds. More sunshine. The light and weather show was better than any TV. The bird was pretty good too.

storm

09/19/16 Cloudland has grown silent. This morning the most wonderful furry critter in the world left our arms and pranced on up into puppy heaven. I've never known such deep, enduring, and completely unconditional love that Lucy brought into our hearts for so many years. There will never be another one like Lucy. And while it is dark and somber and quiet here tonight, there remains light and joy and laughter everywhere - Lucy's spirit will endure forever.

It was love at first sight when Pam and Amber reached out and swept her up from the animal shelter in Springfield in 1999 - someone had abused her during the first year of life, and she was on the list to be put to sleep only a couple of days later. My girls saved Lucy's life - and I think Lucy saved their/our lives in so many ways too. All three girls came into my life a year later, and brought a new form of civilization to the bachelor pad that belonged to my boy, Aspen, and I.

Aspen and Lucy became fast friends and spent nearly 24/7 together until we lost Aspen several years ago. It was then that we discovered Lucy had become deaf - she was using Aspen's ears to help guide her. Lucy was already pretty old at that point, and she went downhill rapidly after Aspen's death. Soon we were unable to leave her alone without her having a panic attack - one of us was always with her. Lucy and I got to spend a great deal of time together, including many long trips into the night while I was working on my nighttime picture book. She may have been deaf, but oh brother could she see and RUN in the dark! I had to get a reflective vest to be able to keep up with her! Lucy is in many of the nighttime photos of mine you've seen published - sometimes little more than a blur, but always a bright spirit.

We got the puppies a couple of years ago to keep Lucy company. Little did we know that the puppies would put a JOLT into her system - the old girl became like a PUPPY herself - running and skipping and playing for hours on end. She could not only keep up with the puppies, but she would often charge right past them. Lucy would usually make the three-mile hike we go on frequently here up on her toes and "prancing" the entire way, with a big grin on her snout - she enjoyed life!

We worried about taking her up into high altitude, but she seemed to really like it up there - in fact she seemed to grow even younger, and would often jump out of the van when we arrived and run off jumping for joy while the rest of us were left standing there trying to catch our breaths! Most dogs don't live to be teenagers - Lucy was almost 19! She was a miracle dog, one for the ages.

One funny note - I've not posted many photos of Lucy here like I have of the other dogs - she did not seem to like the camera. That could be that most of the time I pointed it at her when she was in a pickle - like with her face covered with snow or spider webs! But mostly I could not get many good pictures of her because she was coal BLACK - and a black puppy does not show up very well in photographs. This portrait of her was taken a couple of weeks ago during a hike around a high mountain lake in Colorado. She and I had wandered off from the others and were exploring a little creek, and somehow I think she knew the end was near - she just stood there and posed, happy and beaming. It's the way I'll always remember her.

lucy2

There was a remarkable moment this afternoon at the cabin in the middle of all the gloom. Mia got up and ran over to the glass door to the back deck, then sat there measurmized at something. A beautiful butterfly had landed on the screen. There were dozens of butterflies in the sky behind, floating on the breezes and heading south for the winter. Perhaps the torch has been passed to a new generation.

Lucy, you were an elegant lady who brought so much love and joy to all of us. Now you are free to romp and prance and chase squirrels once again with your old pal, Aspen. I am weeping inside and out for you tonight though - you have shown so brightly in our lives all these years and brought us untold happiness. It was an honor to share your world. Thank you so much our little princess.....

09/21/16 A post card sent down from Lucy - The last Milky Way of summer from Cloudland.

MilkyWaysmall

09/24/16 It has been a difficult week at Cloudland, one filled with heartache and tears. There were times when Pam and I just sat and stared, not knowing what to do or say. Lucy had been with us, a part of our lives, and quite literally next to us 24/7/365 for such a long time, and then all of a sudden, not only was this amazing little heart not beating, but there was a vacuum left in her place. And then quite the opposite was true - everywhere we went and looked she was there - standing in the hallway where she always stood waiting on us to do this or that so she could follow; the spot where she slept during the day at our feet during work; and at times of the day that were her special times - like at 3pm. We never knew how she knew, but no matter where we were, what time zone even, at 3pm she would began to pant and her entire body would shake and jitter - it was her meal time. We automatically looked around to find her at 3pm every day this week, but she was not there. (On a side note, the puppies now get the can of special food we always had on hand for Lucy, precisely at 3pm!) I guess 3pm will always be our "Lucy hour."

There is a lot of open space in our cabin, with many windows, some towing quite high into the sky. At times of the day there are "sun spots" where sunshine floods in and makes a spot of light on the floor. That was always Lucy's spot - she LOVED laying in the sun, the hotter the better! Many times this week while passing through the cabin we would stop and fully expect to see her right there at our feet in the sunspot, whevever it happened to be. Every time it was heartache all over again that she was not there, yet would always being a smile of joy and laughter - "Lucy would have loved this sunspot today!"

Two especially heartache moments of my week and then I'll move one. These past few years since we lost Aspen, whenever I would be over in the print room working long hours, I would leave the door to the gallery open just a crack. At some point during my work I would hear the creek of that door, and moments later Lucy would appear and lay down at my feet, sprawled out across the floor. She never asked for anything while there - it was like she understood that I had work to do, but wanted me to know she would be there to keep me company. A couple of days ago I had an especially long processing session that I had to get done, and as habit I left the door cracked open just a little bit. I was having some difficulty getting one particular image to work, and was almost at wits end - it was the final image that I had to get done to complete a large project. And then I heard it - the creek of the front door. My heart SOARED knowing Lucy would soon be there beside me!!! But when I turned around to look, and even got up and walked into the next room towards the door, I found only silence and emptiness. Lucy, of course, was not there - would never be coming through the door to keep me company ever again. This was one of the tougher moments and I broke down. But then I realized, it must have been Lucy at the door after all - sending a gust of wind down to push the door open a little bit to help snap me out of my funk. It worked - I ran back to the computer, started with the problem image all over again, and in two minutes I figured out how to make it work. I guess that little gust of Lucy-wind cleared out the cobwebs and allowed me to think again.

Later on I was outside taking a long, hot shower. This was another place where Lucy would often come running up just to check on me. She would stand there next to me and peer down into the wilderness - I know she could not hear the roar of the Buffalo River below since she was deaf, but I believe she was soaking in a great deal of it in her own way. I finished my shower and started to walk around the deck to the back door then I was stopped in my tracks and I gasped. There were a single set of tiny muddy footprints on the deck leading from the shower to that door - they were Lucy's prints (none of the other dogs ever went down to that deck, only Lucy). She somehow had gotten down off the deck the last time she'd been there, and I had to step down and help her back up onto the deck. The ground was muddy, and as she followed me inside she left those little footprints. There were not enough towels to dry all my tears that day...

OK, fast forward to the present. Yesterday morning my lovely bride and I both sat up in bed at the same time - at 2am. Life at the cabin seemed to have come to a standstill this week without Lucy. We needed to move forward and breathe some fresh air. "Why don't we just go ahead and leave now?" And so we hurriedly filled the van, collected our puppies, and sped off into the night. Those of you who live in NWA will know how refreshing this was - we made it completely through Springdale on Hwy. 412 and only hit ONE RED STOPLIGHT! Not much traffic at 4am so all the lights were green - it was DELIGHTFUL! 15 hours later we arrived at our campsite in Colorado. The hills everywhere were ablaze with the peak of fall color - much of it a week or two early. We don't have much time here before we have to get back home to Cloudland, and it seems as if Colorado wants to put on a good show for us while we're here.

Just before we left the cabin, I ran back inside and grabbed something off the mantle - I attached Lucy's collar to the spot in the van where all the dogs' leashes hang - Lucy would be going on this trip with us! Actually she has been on more long-distance trips than any of our dogs, so that was only fitting.

It is a brisk 25 degrees at our campsite this morning as I'm writing this. We had several hours of blowing snow last night, but the skies cleared and oh my goodness the STARS that came out were just incredible! A half-moon was quite brilliant at 4 when I got up this morning. The snow that stuck to the ground and trees is above our 9,200' elevation campsite so only a thick layer of frost is here, but I think we'll make a run higher this morning and go play in it a little bit. We've heard some areas nearby got 3-6 inches of snow last night - YIPPIE COYOTE!

09/25/16 We spent some time yesterday morning touring around the area viewing some of the quickly-melting snowy mountains, and got a few snapshots at one small lake - brilliant aspen reflections were just wonderful. In trying to hike around the lake to get a better vantage point, I found myself in the middle of a marsh area - fortunately it was frozen solid (several inches deep) - all except for one spot where I fell through. My boots filled with cool water and I felt like an idiot, which I was! I didn't find any great photos over there, but hopefully learned a little more about hiking on ice. (I do come home with wet feet a lot, so maybe I'm a slow learner.)

TuckerPondsReflection1

Then we drove several miles up a rough forest road that reminded us a bit of Cave Mountain Road in Arkansas - ICY! Of course, the temp was in the low 20's and we were at nearly 12,000' elevation. But our 4wd van worked great and we made it up and back down again without slipping.

I would return to the same road late last night to shoot the Milky Way rising - no moon, so the sky was very dark and BLACK! When I first arrived on top of the Continental Divide and hiked out to a spot that overlooks about a million miles of mountain peaks, I set down my camera gear, put my hands in my pockets, and closed my eyes. A few minutes later I opened them and think I saw more twinkling stars than I'd ever seen anywhere - the sky was so clear and stars so bright! I know there is a reason why we see the stars "twinkle" but I can't think of it now. No question they really do, at least in our minds. So I set up and took a series of photos and quickly realized there was a lot of light pollution along the horizon. Oops. This was COLORADO, at nearly 12,000' high, on top of the Continental Divide, and still a lot of light pollution. Actually the clearer the air/atmosphere, the farther a single street light will travel.

While standing there waiting for one small cloud bank to move out of the picture, I listened to the Razorback game - which at the time was very exciting since we had just made a great drive and took the lead - yippie! (I used to be on the Razorback swim team.) The temp on the Divide was back down into the mid-20s, and the wind was HOWLING - 30mph, probably more. So that put the wind chill down in the teens or below. I'm a grizzled old wilderness veteran of course, but it was down right chilly on these old bones! And to make matters worse I was just standing there not moving or creating any internal heat. But I was prepared, and ended up putting on a pair of rain pants, plus four or five top layers.

I waited until I was sure the sky was as dark as possible (and the cloud moved on a little), then took a few last photos and packed it in for the night - disappointed at the light pollution that was not going away. I was back home and snug in our "tent" with my bride by 10:30. I never heard the end of the Hog game (probably a good thing). Tonight I hope to make the long drive (36 miles on rough dirt road) to another shooting location up high to get another chance at shooting the Milky Way with no light pollution. Lots of driving for a single photo, but it is what I love to do, and really need right no - 'tis great therapy for the soul.

MilkyWay2

The temp in camp just before dawn this morning is right at freezing - much warmer than yesterday - and it feels terrific out wandering through our miniature aspen forest here. The puppies are at my feet, anxiously waiting me to reach for the leashes so they can run up the mountain. I'll let ya know if we find any fall color today, and hope to post a better Milky Way photo tonight. In the meantime, HAPPY SUNDAY!

FYI, parts of Colorado are experiencing an EPIC fall color event right now - some of the photos I've seen online are nothing short of INCERDIBLE1 I'm not here to be a part of all that this time, so can only admire from a distance. I'm saving myself for the same sort of amazing fall color season back in Arkansas in a few weeks...

carpetofaspens

AspenSunstar1

September 2016 Journal Part AAugust 2016 Journal Part BAugust 2016 Journal Part A

July 2016 JournalJune 2016 JournalMay 2016 Journal Part BMay 2016 Journal Part AApril 2016 Journal

March 2016 JournalFebruary 2016 JournalJanuary 2016 JournalDecember 2015 JournalNovember 2015 Journal

October 2015 JournalSeptember 2015 JournalAugust 2015 Journal BAugust 2015 Journal A

July 2015 JournalJune 2015 JournalMay 2015 Journal April 2015 JournalMarch 2015 Journal

February 2015 JournalJanuary 2015 JournalDecember 2014 JournalNovember 2014 Journal

October 2014 JournalSeptember 2014JournalAugust 2014 JournalJuly 2014 Journal Part B

July 2014 Journal Part AJune 2014 Journal Part BJune 2014 Journal Part AMay 2014 Journal

April 2014 JournalMarch 2043 Journal Part BMarch 2043 Journal Part AFebruary 2014 Journal

January 2014 JournalDecember 2013 JournalNovember 2013 JournalOctober 2013 Journal

September 2013 JournalAugust 2013 JournalJuly 2013 JournalJune 2013 Journal BJune 2013 Journal A

May 2013 Journal BMay 2013 Journal AApril 2013 JournalMarch 2013 Journal

February 2013 JournalJanuary 2013 Journal BJanuary 2013 Journal ADecember 2012 JournalNovember 2012 Journal

October 2012 Journal BOctober 2012 Journal ASeptember 2012 Journal BSeptember 2012 Journal A

August 2012 JournalJuly 2012 JournalJune 2012 Journal

May 2012 Journal BMay 2012 Journal AApril 2012 Journal BApril 2012 Journal A

March 2012 Journal BMarch 2012 Journal AFebruary 2012 JournalJanuary 2012 Journal BJanuary 2012 Journal A

December 2011 JournalNovember 2011 JournalOctober 2011 JournalSeptember 2011 JournalAugust 2011 Journal

July 2011 JournalJune 2011 Journal

September 1998 JournalAugust 1998 Journal • July 1998 JournalJune 1998 JournalMay 1998 Journal

Older Journal Archives

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

June 2016 JournalMay 2016 Journal Part BMay 2016 Journal Part AApril 2016 Journal

March 2016 JournalFebruary 2016 JournalJanuary 2016 JournalDecember 2015 JournalNovember 2015 Journal

October 2015 JournalSeptember 2015 JournalAugust 2015 Journal BAugust 2015 Journal A

July 2015 JournalJune 2015 JournalMay 2015 Journal April 2015 JournalMarch 2015 Journal

February 2015 JournalJanuary 2015 JournalDecember 2014 JournalNovember 2014 Journal

October 2014 JournalSeptember 2014JournalAugust 2014 JournalJuly 2014 Journal Part B

July 2014 Journal Part AJune 2014 Journal Part BJune 2014 Journal Part AMay 2014 Journal

April 2014 JournalMarch 2043 Journal Part BMarch 2043 Journal Part AFebruary 2014 Journal

January 2014 JournalDecember 2013 JournalNovember 2013 JournalOctober 2013 Journal

September 2013 JournalAugust 2013 JournalJuly 2013 JournalJune 2013 Journal BJune 2013 Journal A

May 2013 Journal BMay 2013 Journal AApril 2013 JournalMarch 2013 Journal

February 2013 JournalJanuary 2013 Journal BJanuary 2013 Journal ADecember 2012 JournalNovember 2012 Journal

October 2012 Journal BOctober 2012 Journal ASeptember 2012 Journal BSeptember 2012 Journal A

August 2012 JournalJuly 2012 JournalJune 2012 Journal

May 2012 Journal BMay 2012 Journal AApril 2012 Journal BApril 2012 Journal A

March 2012 Journal BMarch 2012 Journal AFebruary 2012 JournalJanuary 2012 Journal BJanuary 2012 Journal A

December 2011 JournalNovember 2011 JournalOctober 2011 JournalSeptember 2011 JournalAugust 2011 Journal

July 2011 JournalJune 2011 Journal

September 1998 JournalAugust 1998 Journal • July 1998 JournalJune 1998 JournalMay 1998 Journal

Older Journal Archives

FreeCounter